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Communication

You and your child: two different worlds, two different perspectives—and a giant disconnect that can make communicating a real mystery. Communicating with your child or teen can be challenging and yet, there are so many important conversations you need to have with your kids throughout their lives. You need to communicate with them about their responsibilities at home and school. Sometimes you need to have tough conversations about things like peer pressure, bullying, online safety, drugs and alcohol, and sex. And then you need to communicate about topics outside of their control like violence in the world, events being reported in the news, or natural disasters. You may even need to communicate about how to communicate with others!

This can all be difficult to navigate. To start, here are some suggested articles/blog posts that will show you effective ways to communicate with your child or teen. Then you’ll find a full listing of our articles and posts on communication, including how to talk to your kids about tough subjects.

Negotiating with Kids: When You Should and Shouldn’t

5 Secrets for Communicating with Teenagers

Moody Kids: How to Respond to Pouting, Whining and Sulking

Pouting, sulking and whining are three of the most annoying ways that kids communicate their displeasure, anger or frustration with a situation. This behavior is not just limited to young children, either—teens do it because they haven’t always learned the skills to express their frustration in an appropriate way. Simply put: it works for... Read more »

Help! My Child is “The Constant Interrupter”

Does your child seem to interrupt every conversation with the words, "But Mom..." or "But Dad..." ? Do they constantly cut you off mid-sentence to tell you that something's not fair?   Interrupting comes from a variety of sources, including over-stimulation, competition with siblings and peers, impulsivity and general family patterns of communication. It’s helpful to... Read more »