Dr. Robert Myers, PhD

Dr Robert Myers is a child psychologist with more than 25 years of experience working with children and adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and learning disabilities and is the creator of the Total Focus Program®. Dr Myers is Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at UC Irvine School of Medicine. "Dr Bob" has provided practical information for parents as a radio talk show host and as editor of Child Development Institute's website, 4parenting.com, which reaches 3 million parents each year. Dr. Myers earned his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California.

ADHD: Disorder or Difference?

By Dr. Robert Myers, PhD


The word “disorder” conjures up images of illness, disease and serious disabilities.  All parents want to see their child as the smartest, most capable and best liked boy or girl on the block.  So why would they want to have a label attached to them that often conveys just the opposite--such as slow learner,... Read more »

Dr. Bob on ADHD: To Medicate or Not to Medicate?

By Dr. Robert Myers, PhD


I fully understand the concerns of parents regarding medication for ADHD. My wife and I struggled with this when my son was 5. He had a great response to stimulant medication and remained on medication until he was 14. He suffered no observable side effects. He is a 6’4” guy who completed college with honors... Read more »

Early Intervention Helps Children with ADHD

By Dr. Robert Myers, PhD


The earlier you can diagnose ADHD, the better. Kids often struggle in school and in the community due to a lack of help and from a misunderstanding of their condition. This often leads to frustration, increased inappropriate behavior, poor academic achievement, and eventually low self-esteem and depression, not to mention an increased likelihood for substance... Read more »

The Connection Between ADHD and Bullying

By Dr. Robert Myers, PhD


The February issue of Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology features a study that says kids with ADHD are more likely to be bullied at school--or to actually be bullies themselves. Researchers followed 577 Swedish fourth graders for one year, with nearly 10 percent of the boys and 1.6 percent of the girls being diagnosed with... Read more »

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