Introducing the Empowering Parents Blog -“The Blog for Effective Parenting”

Posted January 21, 2008 by

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Welcome to the Empowering Parents Blog, “The Blog for Effective Parenting”. At EP, above all we know what it means to tackle the difficult problems parents face with their children and teens. We’ll be writing about the latest child behavior issues, reporting on trends in parenting, and asking you to give us your take on raising kids. You’ll be happy to hear that James Lehman, MSW and Dr. Bob Myers will be contributing bloggers, in addition to other experts who will stop by to chat about everything from the latest findings on eating disorders to the real story on what’s happening on MySpace.com. Come and check it out, post a comment, join the discussion—we can’t wait to hear from you!
So welcome—we hope you’ll make our blog part of your daily routine in 2008.

About

Elisabeth Wilkins was the editor of Empowering Parents and the mother of an 10-year-old son. Her work has appeared in national and international publications, including Mothering, Motherhood (Singapore), Hausfrau, The Bad Mother Chronicles, and The Japan Times. Elisabeth holds a Masters in Fine Arts in Creative Writing from the University of Southern Maine.

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  1. D. Rowden, Parental Support Advisor (Edit) Report

    To “carmel”: Thank you for writing in. School issues can be very challenging for parents. You know how important it is for your son to go to school but you can’t seem to convince how important it is. You could look into other schools; however, changing schools doesn’t guarantee the attendance issue is going to be solved. It would be beneficial if you could find out what problem he’s trying to solve by not going to school. From what you have written, it sounds like you’ve attempted to have a problem-solving conversation with him. It also sounds like he used a turn around and blamed his non-attendance on the school being stupid and his dislike of the teachers. The reality of the situation is it’s his responsibility to go to school, whether he likes the teachers or not. We would suggest trying to have a problem-solving conversation with him again to find out what he’s trying to accomplish by not going to school. Sara Bean has written an article about problem solving I think you would find helpful: The Surprising Reason for Bad Child Behavior: “I Can’t Solve Problems.” We would also advise holding him accountable when he chooses not to go to school. Regardless of what he may be using as an excuse, he is still making a choice not to attend. We often advise parents with this issue to withhold electronics privileges when he chooses not to go to school. When he goes to school, he can earn access to those privileges again. Ultimately, you can’t make him go to school but you can hold him accountable and motivate him to make a better choice. There are natural consequences, as well, for the choices he is making. It can be beneficial to allow the natural consequences of his choices happen as well. For more information on the benefits of natural consequences, you might like the article Why You Should Let Your Child Fail The Benefits of Natural Consequences. We wish you and your son luck as you continue to work through this struggle. Take care.

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  2. carmel (Edit) Report

    My child says he hates school. He even got to the point where he would not go. I have asked him all the questions but his only answer is ‘its stupid and i hate the teachers,. I have inquired about changing him but the other school cant take him till next year. How serious should I take him or should I tell him to just get on with it or should I look at another school. Please help!!!!!!

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