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Parenting Articles about Self Esteem

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Low Self-esteem in Kids Part II: 3 Ways to Help Your Child Now

Low Self-esteem in Kids Part II: 3 Ways to Help Your Child Now

When a child has low self-esteem, many parents search endlessly for ways to make them feel better about themselves. They compliment their child for minor accomplishments or lower the standards to make them feel better, and nothing changes. They want to fix the problem now, when in reality, they should be coaching their child on how they can overcome their issues on their own.

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Low Self-Esteem in Kids, Part I: Forget What You've Heard—It's a Myth

Low Self-Esteem in Kids, Part I: Forget What You've Heard—It's a Myth

Is your child struggling with low self-esteem? As a parent, it’s tough to stand by and see our children feeling like they don’t “measure up” or can’t handle things as well as their peers seem to do. Here, James Lehman, MSW debunks the myth of focusing on children’s feelings at the expense of teaching them how to master life-skills. Part I of a two-part series on “Self-Esteem and Kids.”

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Why Raising a Well-Rounded Child Doesn’t Work (and What to Do Instead)

Blogger My son loves anything with a screen: computer games, YouTube, apps, TV. (And let’s admit it, who hasn’t looked up a funny SNL skit and realized an hour later that they’ve just laughed themselves past the kids’ bedtime?)  So I was hesitant when he asked to join a computer programming club. “Does he really need more time sitting at a computer?” I thought. “Shouldn’t we find him something else to do so he’s more well-rounded?” But I quieted that voice because I’ve learned that being well-rounded may actually limit our potential.
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What If That Challenging Child Behavior Is Also a Strength?

Blogger What if your child’s bossiness or argumentativeness or the energy she has the moment she jumps out of bed is actually a strength that she was born with? What if she simply has not had the life experience to develop and maximize its potential? What if, as you are trying to tame the bossiness, to make the persistence more flexible or to rein in the energy, you might be overlooking your child's natural born strength? What if there were successful strategies you could implement that would support the mastery of your child’s strength as well as integrate brain functions and bring greater harmony to your family?
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The Narcissistic Generation? More U.S. College Students Say They're Superior

Blogger An annual survey of college freshman in the U.S. has found that the number of students who define themselves as gifted and ambitious has grown yet again. Those who say they have a strong desire to achieve has also risen, even when their past grade performance does not reflect this self-assessment.
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Kids and Competitive Sports: Too Much Pressure?

Parent Blogger A child playing any sport that includes uniforms, umpires, coaches, players and parents will often sense an intense need that they succeed from the adults around them. That intense pressure contains all the elements that can cause eventual failure.
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Disturbing Pre-teen Trend: Am I Ugly? Videos on Youtube

Blogger If there's someone out there who didn't go through extreme angst over their looks during their middle school years, I'd like to meet them. Somehow, we all got through it and learned to accept ourselves for who we were. (It's an ongoing process, after all, but I have to admit that I wouldn't go back to those pre-teen years for anything.) The difference between us and our kids: we didn't have the internet and social networking to contend with.
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Child Self-esteem: How We Put Our Stuff on Our Children

Blogger Just because people become parents doesn't mean they don't have issues, concerns or negative habits. As individuals who may not have “worked through” past issues, it's easy for parents to put their “stuff” on their children. Many parents make the mistake of living through their children -- and we often don't even realize when we're doing it! But it's important to understand that pushing a child to do things for the wrong reasons isn't good for their development and can result in low self esteem and exhaustion.
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The Unwritten Social Rules for Girls: Compliments, Comparing and Self-Esteem

Parent Blogger Why, I would like to know, do we teach our teen daughters to be demure and to minimize compliments? When did we make a collective decision to teach them about the unwritten social rule that they must never admit to liking their bodies? When did we decide to teach them to hide their good grades so they are not seen as too smart, too aggressive, bragging, or too competitive? Why, if they have a blemish, do they need to point it out to their friends immediately?
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Child Self-esteem: How Much Is Praise Worth?

Blogger Want to improve your child’s self-esteem? Praise him constantly and stop anything that may hurt his perception of being a competent, achieving person. With every success, your child will see that he is a winner and will continue to achieve. Sounds like good advice doesn’t it? Well, it is terribly misguided.
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Kids and Self-Esteem: How to Help Them Grow a Thicker Skin

Parent Blogger How do we teach our kids to develop some tough skin to weather the never-ending schoolyard gossip and drama? It starts so young these days -- much earlier than I remember. Our kids come home fragile and in tears, basing their happiness on these fickle, yet pivotal interactions. I see it more with my girls. (My boys are perhaps still too immature to care, although I believe boys and girls are wired differently.)
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Rewards Might Work Like Medication for Kids with ADHD

Blogger Interestingly, a new study conducted at Nottingham University in the UK found that immediate rewards in the form of points in a video game had a similar effect on brain activity in kids with ADHD as stimulant medication does.  Based on EEG results, the team found that both the rewards and the child’s usual dose of stimulant medication resulted in the normalization of brain regions and improved task completion, though the medication yielded a slightly higher effect.
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