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Welcome to the EP Parenting Blog


This is the place to read blog posts from our experts and from EP's team of dedicated Parent Bloggers, who write about their own experiences raising their children. Comment, ask questions, and share advice. If you're interested in blogging for us, please click here.
Mar
23
Posted By:

Spring has arrived on the calendar, if not in my backyard in Maine.  With the longer days and slowly increasing temperatures, my thoughts often turn to for outdoor projects.  I plan out my vegetable garden, uncover my flower beds, and wait for signs of growth.
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Mar
18
Posted By:

I was shocked to hear my dad tell me, over a decade after I had made it out of adolescence, that both he and my mum had been afraid of me at times when I was a teenager. He said they felt helpless and powerless, often wondering what the best way to deal with me was. Now you might be wondering what kind of nightmare child I was, but the truth of it was that I was just a regular teen. I felt angry and didn’t know how to express it. I felt that nobody understood me and nobody ever would, and I often reacted in a way that did not encourage connection with those around me.
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Mar
16
Posted By:

We live in a very external-focused world, where many people find themselves seeking the answer to the question, “What’s in it for me?”  We hesitate to commit and say yes to requests or new responsibilities before carefully evaluating whether or not there will be a worthwhile benefit to us.  Our children are not that different from us when it comes to the “What’s in it for me?” concept, and this can create challenges when it comes to being open to giving and receiving gratitude.
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Mar
11
Posted By:

Imagine you are living in a post-apocalyptic world where resources are scarce. There is fierce competition for basic necessities. Not only are resources scarce, they are controlled by a small but powerful monarchy. These rulers have so much power that they control all the food, clothing, and shelter. They assign you your living place and may even force you to share that space with your most hated rival. Everything you get depends on pleasing them. They are capricious—one minute bestowing gifts to you and the next putting you on some gruesome work detail.  Your rivals plot against you and report any wrong-doing to the rulers. Sometimes they even lie about you just to secure their own position in the ranks.
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Mar
08
Posted By:

As an infant, my daughter was a fairly easy baby. As long as her needs were met, she was an easy child, very alert and highly social. However the older she got, and the more her idea of what to do conflicted with what I wanted her to do, the more “difficult” she became. She seemed to have a will of iron.  When she made up her mind to do something, she didn’t care what the consequences were going to be. She was going to do it.
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Mar
04
Posted By:

Now that Madison, my first-born, is fifteen, some of the rituals we shared when she was a toddler are beginning to fade in my old age. Last weekend, though, she reminded me of one. Madison was babysitting our neighbor’s three-year old, Chloe; and Chloe asked Madison to read her story after story. “After the tenth and final book,” Madison told me, “instead of saying, ‘The End’, I said, ‘The Chooka-Makah’. Chloe asked me what I had said. I really had no idea. Where did that come from?”
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Mar
02
Posted By:

It used to be said that it took a village to raise a child.  But, not every parent shares that village view anymore, particularly when it involves disciplining other people’s children.  Whether you’re dealing with a playdate-gone-bad or a step-child who is crossing the line, remember, it’s OK to set limits and ask others to abide by them.
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Feb
23
Posted By:

As a parent, you want nothing but the best for your child. It’s important to you that your child develops healthy friendships, has a memorable school experience, and achieves their goals and dreams. Providing meaningful opportunities for your child and celebrating their accomplishments goes a long way towards raising their self-esteem and confidence. There is, however, another vital element that can literally make or break whether your child moves forward in life or not: the “success mindset.”
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