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Welcome to the EP Parenting Blog


This is the place to read blog posts from our experts and from EP's team of dedicated Parent Bloggers, who write about their own experiences raising their children. Comment, ask questions, and share advice. If you're interested in blogging for us, please click here.
Apr
23
Posted By:

It’s any normal day. You’re at work, doing work stuff, and you get a call from the principal at your son’s school: he’s been suspended for three days for roughhousing on the bus. Or, maybe he’s already had a few mishaps in behavior and is now facing a much longer suspension. Or, maybe it’s a more serious offense and school personnel are already talking about expulsion proceedings. What can you, as a parent, do in response to these situations?

Read more »

Apr
17
Posted By:

What is the worst thing a parent can feel, in your opinion? I’ll give you a few seconds to think about that before I give you my answer.

From my perspective, the worst thing a parent can feel is “hopeless.” This is when you’re feeling like there’s no hope for you, your child or your family because everything, absolutely everything, is going wrong and there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

I’ve talked with many parents who have been on this road; I’ve been there myself.

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Apr
14
Posted By:

Children lie about all kinds of things for a variety of reasons. Why do children fabricate stories about doing their homework, who they are hanging out with, and what behaviors they are engaging in outside of the home? Recent studies have found that most children learn to lie between the ages of two and four. It is part of their emotional and intellectual development. However, from about age four on, children learn to lie from the people around them. Take for instance a shirt that a child receives on his birthday from his grandparents. The parents say to the child, “Don’t tell Grandma you don’t like the shirt. Make sure you say, ‘Thank you,’ and tell her that you like it.”

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Apr
11
Posted By:

“You don’t understand — this kid doesn’t care about anything!! I tell him there are consequences for his bad grades: he doesn’t care.  I offer him rewards for good grades: he doesn’t care.  I try to let him go through the natural consequences, and still nothing!  How do I make him care about his grades, and get him to realize how important school is before it’s too late?”

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Apr
09
Posted By:

Someday, every parent has to do it: Every child grows into a young adult, and wants to live their life without being given tons of advice.  Forcibly or voluntarily, mothers and fathers everywhere are learning how to let go.  This process can be quite painful at times, for both the parents and the young adult.

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Apr
03
Posted By:
Parent Blogger

Foster kids often carry the weight of the world on their shoulders.  These children have often experienced profound physical or emotional abuse.  Such abuse is traumatizing and leaves wounds that are not immediately obvious – or for that matter, easy to address. Many times those wounds have never completely healed, and so they appear again when the child reaches a new home or situation.

Foster parents can help.

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Apr
02
Posted By:

If you’re a parent or stepparent in a blended family, chances are you’ve experienced some situations that left you feeling stumped, confused or stressed. As a mom and member of a blended family myself, I’ve found that the challenges and rewards never stop coming. Over time, our family has learned how to make it work, but it didn’t happen over night. We’ve found that the keys to success are communication, support — and a willingness to step back. (I’ll explain more about this in my tips below.)

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Mar
27
Posted By:

I used to worry that my kids played too many video games, especially my 11-year old son who is obsessed with Minecraft. Like many parents, I fretted over how much time Billy spent gaming and what effects his hobby of choice was having on his health, wellbeing, social life, Vitamin D intake, etc. If you can imagine it, you can bet I worried over it! After reviewing the research on kids and video games, I still worry, but I worry less. What I found was that there may be as many benefits to gaming as there are drawbacks, and there are ways that parents can help their kids make the most of their gaming experiences while still having lots of fun.

Read more »